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Gemstones

Learn about Sapphires, Rubies, Emeralds, Pearls and more. Precious and semi-precious gemstones come in every color imaginable, and they add interest and excitement to any piece of jewelry.

18 articles in this category :: back to FJU home

  1. Peridot is a bright yellow-green gemstone

    Gem in the Spotlight: Peridot

    Peridot is a lovely yellow-green gem with a rich history. Legend has it that Peridot was the favorite gemstone of Cleopatra. The ancients called it the “gem of the sun”. It was believed that peridot could chase away evil spirits and dissolve curses but only when set in gold. Peridot is the birthstone for August. It is also the accepted anniversary gemstone for the 16th year of marriage. Peridot’s unique yellow-green color is very attractive. The name “Peridot” is simply a French word derived from the Arabic for green. Peridot’s... read more »

  2. Tanzanite is a beautiful blue purple gemstone that is very rare

    Gem in the Spotlight: Tanzanite

    Beauty and rarity are two wonderful traits in a gemstone. Tanzanite has them both. In fact, it is estimated that Tanzanite is 1,000 times rarer than diamond. But, what makes Tanzanite so popular is its color. Tanzanite’s gorgeous color is a captivating mix of blue and purple. The deep hues of violet, indigo, and blue come together in an unrivaled blend only found in Tanzanite. The amazing look of Tanzanite demands a price to match. Yet, even with its dynamic look, Tanzanite is still less in price than better known... read more »

  3. Beautiful iolite jewelry and loose gemstones

    Gem in the Spotlight: Iolite

    Iolite is maybe not the first gemstone people think of for their blue-violet jewelry, but it should be near the top of the list. Iolite’s color range of blue, blue-violet, and violet competes for public attention with sapphire, tanzanite, and amethyst. They may have name recognition, but iolite has a rich, unique color and great gem value on its side. It is more subtlety nuanced than amethyst and deeper than many tanzanites. Iolite’s name comes from its violet color. It is from the Greek word “ios” meaning violet. Unlike many... read more »

  4. A stunning rich blue oval sapphire

    Gem in the Spotlight: Sapphire

    Few gems capture the imagination as does sapphire. Sapphire’s beauty inspired people to wonder. Ancient cultures had many lore and beliefs about the sapphire. The ancient Persians believed the earth rested on a giant sapphire whose reflection gave the sky its color. Ancient priests and sorcerers honored sapphire above all gems, for this stone enabled them to interpret oracles and foretell the future. Symbolizing truth, sincerity and tradition, it has been said that when Moses received the Ten Commandments they rested on tablets of sapphires. Marriage partners put great faith... read more »

  5. Loose opal gemstones

    Gem in the Spotlight: Opal

    The opal has been described as containing the wonders of the skies, sparkling rainbows, fireworks, lightening, the gentler fire of the ruby, the rich purple of the amethyst, and the sea-green of the emerald. Opal’s lore is as colorful as the opal itself. The ancient Greeks felt that the opal gave foresight and the gift of prophecy to the wearer. The Romans believed opal was the symbol of hope and purity. In fact, Pliny, the ancient Roman scholar in about 70 A.D., wrote that opal had the fire of the... read more »

  6. Gem in the Spotlight: Quartz

    Quartz is one of the most common minerals on earth. Many of quartz’s gems are common for gemstones but, some varieties are very rare. Some are Plain Jane like rock quartz, others are exotic like Drusy Quartz. Some quartz material is a dollar per pound others are $1,000 per carat. Quartz is a gemstone with surprising variety... read more »

  7. Gem in the Spotlight: Topaz

    Topaz is a gemstone with amazing variety. Topaz is naturally colorless and clear like a diamond, but it can also take on an entire range of colors. Yellow to reddish-orange is known as Precious Topaz or Imperial Topaz. Imperial Topaz is one of the expensive varieties of Topaz. Gem suppliers can even bombard Topaz in a nuclear reactor to produce various shades of Blue Topaz. Topaz is the birthstone for November, and they make great gifts for anyone born in November, or for anyone that just likes beautiful jewelry... read more »

  8. Blue Zircon loose gems and jewelry

    Gem in the Spotlight: Blue Zircon

    Zircon may be last in the alphabet of gemstones, but it is first in sparkle. The crystal structure of zircon creates one of the liveliest displays found in any colored gem. In fact, before any of the manmade diamond simulates were made, the colorless version of zircon was used in jewelry to mimic diamond. Why? Natural zircon is known for its scintillation, brilliance, and flashes of color or fire just like diamond. Zircon also is known for its variety of colors. Blue zircon is the most popular color. But, zircon... read more »

  9. Synthetic Gems: The Whole Story

    Synthetic rubies, emeralds, sapphires, diamonds and more are everywhere. Man made gems come in many forms: every thing from simple glass to high tech chemical tongue twister like gadolinium gallium garnet (also called GGG) and the modern diamond simulant moissanite. Synthetic gems are not bad, fakes, or the curse of a modern society. The more you know about them, the better you can understand their place in our society and in the jewelry world... read more »